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NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio has reportedly told people privately that he plans a gubernatorial bid

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New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has started to tell people privately that he plans to mount a gubernatorial bid, according to three individuals with direct knowledge of his talks with fellow Democrats and donors, the New York Times reported.

On Wednesday de Blasio said that he has spoken to people to say that he desires to "continue in public service."

"I got a lot to offer. I wanna do more in public service. How that's going to play out, there's time to figure out, but that's my goal," the mayor said.

Mayor de Blasio Holds Media Availability youtu.be

"The simple fact is that he hasn't made any final decisions at all about what he's doing next," said Peter Ragone, who the Times described as the adviser who might be closest to the mayor's deliberations. "The mayor believes in public service because he can do things like push universal pre-K and 3-K. That's why millions of New Yorkers have voted for him in the past 12 years, to the dismay of political insiders."

De Blasio, who has served as New York City's Mayor since 2014, announced a presidential bid in 2019 but ultimately suspended his campaign several months months later.

"Osama bin Laden is probably more popular in Suffolk County than Bill de Blasio," Chairman of the Suffolk County Democratic Committee Rich Schaffer said, according to the Times, which noted that Schaffer has endorsed Gov. Kathy Hochul. "De Blasio, I would say, would have zero support if not negative out here."

Sworn into office in August in the wake of Gov. Andrew Cuomo's resignation, Hochul, who previously served as lieutenant governor, became the first woman ever to serve as governor of the Empire State. She plans to seek election during the state's gubernatorial contest.

Rev. Al Sharpton said he had talked to de Blasio about a possible run recently but that de Blasio did not indicate if he had arrived at a final choice on the matter, according to the Times.

"He has some standing in the progressive community, he has some standing in communities of color," Sharpton said. "He should not be taken lightly."

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