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Whitlock: Sports Illustrated ‘Swimsuit Issue’ another historic moment in the rewriting of American history

Op-ed
Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images

The left-wing obsession with placing itself on the right side of the fraudulent history that corporate media plans to write reached a historic zenith yesterday. At least Sports Illustrated thinks so.

The formerly iconic sports magazine trumpeted its 2021 Swimsuit Issue with bold proclamations about its history-making trifecta of cover models.

Tennis star Naomi Osaka is the first Haitian and Japanese cover model.

Megan Thee Stallion is the first rapper and uncastrated male horse cover model.

And Leyna Bloom, well, she's the GOAT of GOATs. Bloom is the first transgender cover model.

But that's not all. Osaka, Thee Stallion, and Bloom are the first trio of black people to grace the cover of SI's Swimsuit Issue.

Yesterday, blue-check Twitter and legacy media partied like it was 2099 and the Great Reset was celebrating its 70th birthday.

Cosmopolitan magazine tweeted with glee. "Megan Thee Stallion makes history as the first rapper ever to pose for 'Sports Illustrated Swimsuit' cover."

Page Six tweeted about Bloom and Osaka. Entertainment Weekly, People Magazine, the Today Show all threw Twitter confetti high in the air. This is progress. This is history. This is a transformational moment in American culture. This is Neil Armstrong taking one giant leap for mankind.

This swimsuit edition reminds me of other great moments in black history. My parents remember exactly where they were in 1947 when Jackie Robinson broke baseball's color barrier. My grandparents fondly remember when Jesse Owens took four gold medals at the Berlin Olympics. Has anyone forgotten that day in 1974 when Hank Aaron smashed home run number 715 and surpassed Babe Ruth?

Who will forget this moment when desperate editors of a failing magazine resorted to a publicity stunt exploiting racial tension and gender dysphoria?

"This moment heals a lot of pain in the world," Leyna Bloom tweeted. "We deserve this moment; we have waited millions of years to show up as survivors and be seen as full humans filled with wonder."

I get Bloom's joy. Gender dysphoria is a serious issue. I'm not going to begrudge Bloom and other transgenders their sense of normalcy.

My problem is with packaging of gender dysphoria with the black race. Sports Illustrated made intentional, calculated choices. The company injected race into the Swimsuit equation. These choices are subjective. No one earns the Swimsuit cover. It's given. It's not an accomplishment. It's affirmative action.

There was a time when magazines such as Sports Illustrated gained attention celebrating the actual history-making accomplishments of all athletes. Now, legacy print publications and corporate media outlets troll the public for relevance and cast their virtue signals as historic moments.

Why wouldn't they? They plan to write the history your grandchildren and great-grandchildren will read. In the world that corporate media are plotting, immoral, pornographic rappers will be portrayed as thought leaders and public intellectuals. Biological men with the balls to surgically transition to women will be described as heroes and every bit as courageous as the soldiers who stormed Normandy.

In the aftermath of the Great Reset, the Christian values that led this country down the path to freedom and greatness will be characterized as evil.

My problem is that the puppet masters are using race and racism as the Trojan horses to socially engineer America into a new reality. No one made history with the SI covers. The Swimsuit Issue is the further rewriting of history. It's another companion to the New York Times' 1619 Project. Let's call it the 36-24-36 Project, written by the Alphabet Mafia.
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