‘Vinegar Bible’ provides a cautionary tale of style over substance

Glenn Beck is joined by Jeremy Boyd and Ellen Wheeler to take a look at the so-called “Vinegar Bible” to explain one of the 9/12 principles.

Printed by John Baskett, the infamous edition of the Bible got its nickname from the multitude of editing errors throughout the holy tome, as the cost of manual corrections prevented the mistakes from being corrected after printing. The most blatant error is the chapter heading in Luke 20 which reads “The Parable of the Vinegar” instead of “The Parable of the Vineyard.””

You look right here, and there is one of the glaring mistakes. And it is the glaring mistake that named this Bible. It became the ‘Vinegar Bible,'” Jeremy explains.

“This is the Rolls-Royce of Bibles at the time. They open it up and they’re like, ‘Vinegar?'” Glenn says.

Jeremy goes on to say that this handsome edition of the Bible was considered a status symbol at the time and was made to look good and sit unused on the shelf, so the typographical errors weren’t considered important. This Bible illustrates the dangers of elevating superficial style over true substance.

“I am the quintessential Christian — but the inside is flawed because the words haven’t been devoured and it’s the show that is revered, not the life that is revered,” Glenn tells us.

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