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Report Says 'Green Buildings' May Be Hazardous to Your Health

"...making the problem worse by pursuing untested or risky energy-efficiency upgrades..."

Last week, we covered a new study that claims that biodegradable products may actually be damaging to the environment. Now, another interesting bit of research has emerged that questions whether green buildings are hazardous to human health.

Those who don't buy into the global warming or climate change mantra, though, won't find vindication in the report's fndings. In it, researchers embrace climate change and examine the potential impact that it has on the indoors. According to FOX News:

The report cautions that climate change can negatively and directly affect indoor air quality in several ways. But the scientists behind the study warn that homeowners and businesses could also be making the problem worse by pursuing untested or risky energy-efficiency upgrades.

"Even with the best intentions, indoor environmental quality issues may emerge with interventions that have not been sufficiently well screened for their effects on occupant safety and health," the report said.

When buildings are made more airtight -- a seemingly beneficial undertaking -- there may be negative moisture and air problems that result. Additionally, asbestos and other harmful materials may emerge when homes and businesses are made more "green" (though FOX notes that these issues aren't limited to environmentally-beneficial changes to buildings).

The report doesn't try to convince the public not to make their homes and businesses more energy efficient. Instead, it calls for organizations to begin tracking the side effects that these green upgrades may have. Then, the public can make more educated decisions on the matter.

One last thing…
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