Watch LIVE

We Met 'Brother K' at the Supreme Court and He's On a Crusade to End...Baby Circumcision

News

"I don't believe in the god of the Old Testament, I certainly don't."

"Intactivist" Brother K protests against infant circumcision outside the U.S. Supreme Court hearing on the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act. Mar. 27, 2013 TheBlaze.

Washington, D.C.-- His real name is Brother K, he's from Sacramento, Calif. and he's a full-time "intactivist." And he has a bloodstain on the crotch of his white pants.

It's not a real bloodstain, though. It's paint made to look like a bloodstain, which is meant to evoke the disturbing image of an older man undergoing a circumcision.

Brother K, holding a sign that says "Don't cut his penis!" was one of hundreds gathered outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday showing support for same-sex marriage as the court heard arguments for and against the Defense of Marriage Act.

Intactivist refers to activists who want laws banning infant circumcision. Brother K is with an intactivist group called Bloodstained Men & Their Friends. "We're a Facebook page," he said. The page has roughly 550 "likes" on Facebook.

BMTF and other intactivists are in D.C. for the 20th anniversary of Genital Integrity Awareness Week. It's a series of marches and demonstrations across the country that have nothing to do with same-sex marriage but many of the intactivists showed up at the Supreme Court with anti-circumcision signs.

"I'm standing on this sidewalk specifically to be part of this movement because I'd say 99 percent of the people in our movement support the LGBT community and their movement," Brother K told TheBlaze. "And actually a lot of the gay community were the founders and chief supporters of our movement. We feel that our two issues go hand in hand. Equal rights for all Americans."

Why the awkward crotch stain? "We wouldn't strap a man down and remove part of his genitals," said Karen Glennon, another intactivist from Shepherdstown, W. Va. "But we do it with baby boys." Intactivists believe circumcision should be something men deal with when they're fully grown and able to decide whether they want the procedure.

As for Brother K, who says he was circumcised as a baby, that's his legal name. So he says. The K stands for "kind."

"I changed my name in 1986 because I never bought the story or the myth or the narrative that my circumcision was a medical mark," he told us. "After researching and studying, I firmly believe and came to the conclusion that the mark on my body was the mark of an ancient, very angry god."

According to the Old Testament, God commanded Abraham to circumcise himself and his son Isaac. It is referenced as a sign of faith in several verses, as well.

" I changed my name in 1986 to cast off that god and that mark and spiritually uncircumcise  myself," the 60-something Brother K said.

Brother K talks with a same-sex marriage supporter outside the U.S. Supreme Court, TheBlaze

There is a medical procedure under which circumcised men can artificially restore their foreskin. Asked if he's had that procedure to complement his spiritual restoration, Brother K declined to answer. "I don't comment on that question," he said. "I mean, I don't mind you asking but I don't comment on that question."

He also wouldn't comment on whether he has a wife or children or what he did before becoming a full-time intactivist. "I did a variety of things in the educational fields" he said of his life before retirement. "I'm saving the details for my autobiography."

So is he an atheist? "The problem with identifying oneself as an atheist is you're letting someone else define what god is," he said. "So no, I do not consider myself an atheist because-- I don't believe in the god of the Old Testament, I certainly don't. but I believe there's a lot of spiritual beauty, truth and wisdom in the Old Testament. But people have to let go of the cruel things that are in there. And they already have, a lot of the stuff but they haven't let go of this (circumcision). Americans across the board, whatever their religion-- Christian Fundamentalist, whatever-- we hear a lot of them say 'that's in the Bible, that's why we do it.'"

While the BMTF group has 550 likes on Facebook, Brother K has over 1,000 friends. His profile says he studied journalism in the class of 1969 at University of Illinois. His Facebook shows that he "likes" the boy band One Direction but his interests are varied, mostly activism related and largely devoid of party politics.

"Let me put it this way, while I don't officially align with either party," he said. "I consider the Republican Party as an obstacle to the United States." At this, a woman standing nearby listening in yells "amen!"

He is, however, an Obama supporter. "I admire President Obama greatly. That doesn't' mean I think he's perfect but I admire him and what he's done and what he's trying to do for the American people."

Follow Eddie Scarry on Twitter @eScarry.

Most recent
All Articles