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Treasury IG: Cincinnati Employees Won't Say Who Gave Orders (But Testimony Points Back to D.C.)

Signs.

(FILE)

J. Russell George. (Getty Images)

Treasury Inspector General J. Russell George said Monday that the Internal Revenue Service employees at the Cincinnati office at the center of the agency’s political targeting scandal won’t say who gave them their orders.

“During our audit, we did pose that question and no one would acknowledge who, if anyone, provided that direction,” George said in response to a question asked during a House Appropriations subcommittee hearing on the matter.

“We have to get to the bottom of that,” acting IRS head Danny Werfel said, assuring his audience that the agency would “uncover every fact”:

But even if certain Cincinnati employees declined to provide George’s team with information regarding the origin of their orders, two anonymous employees (whose names have not yet been revealed) recently told California Congressman Darrell Issa's committee that everything goes back to Washington, D.C.

One of the agents said he was so worried that he’d end up taking the wrap for the IRS’ political targeting that in the summer of 2010 he applied for another job.

“I didn’t want my name in the paper for being this rogue agent for a project I had no control over,” the unnamed employee said.

Another agent said that they are being thrown “underneath the bus” by Washington.

However, although the Cincinnati employees’ denials should "be taken with a grain of salt (like all the other IRS officials’ denials),” David Freddoso writes for the Conservative Intelligence Briefing, “these two interviews both point the finger back at the IRS in Washington — which is consistent with other accounts that both the conservative and mainstream press has unearthed.”

Here are the partial transcripts Congressman Issa’s committee posted on Sunday:

Q: In early 2010, was there a time when you became aware of applications that referenced Tea Party or other conservative groups?

A: In March of 2010, I was made aware.

******

Q: Okay.  Now, was there a point around this time period when [your supervisor] asked you to do a search for similar applications?

A: Yes.

Q: To the best of your recollection, when was this request made?

A: Sometime in early March of 2010.

******

Q: Did [your supervisor] give you any indication of the need for the search, any more context?

A: He told me that Washington, D.C., wanted some cases.

******

Q: So as of April 2010, these 40 cases were held at that moment in your group; is that right?

A: Some were.

Q:  How many were held there?

A: Less than 40.  Some went to Washington, D.C.

Q: Okay.  How many went to Washington, D.C.?

A: I sent seven.

******

Q: So you prepared seven hard copy versions of the applications to go to Washington, D.C.?

A:  Correct.

******

Q: Did he give you any sort of indication as to why he requested you to do that? […]

A: He said Washington, D.C. wanted seven.  Because at one point I believe I heard they were thinking 10, but it came down to seven.  I said okay, seven.

Q: How did you decide which seven were sent?

A: Just the first seven.

Q: The first seven to come into the system?

A: Yes.

*****

Q: Did anyone else ever make a request that you send any cases to Washington?

A:  [Different IRS employee] wanted to have two cases that she couldn’t ‑‑ Washington, D.C. wanted them, but she couldn’t find the paper.  So she requested me, through an email, to find these cases for her and to send them to Washington, D.C.

Q: When was this, what time frame?

A: I don’t recall the time frame, maybe May of 2010.

******

Q: But just to be clear, she told you the specific names of these applicants.

A: Yes.

Q: And she told you that Washington, D.C. had requested these two specific applications be sent to D.C.

A: Yes, or parts of them.

******

Q: Okay.  So she asked you to send particular parts of these applications.

A: Mm‑hmm.

Q: And that was unusual.  Did you say that?

A: Yes.

Q: And she indicated that Washington had requested these specific parts of these specific applications; is that right?

A: Correct.

******

Q: So what do you think about this, that allegation has been made, I think as you have seen in lots of press reports, that there were two rogue agents in Cincinnati that are sort of responsible for all of the issues that we have been talking about today.  What do you think about those allegations?

[…]

A:  It’s impossible.  As an agent we are controlled by many, many people.  We have to submit many, many reports.  So the chance of two agents being rogue and doing things like that could never happen.

******

Q: And you’ve heard, I’m sure, news reports about individuals here in Washington saying this is a problem that was originated in and contained in the Cincinnati office, and that it was the Cincinnati office that was at fault.  What is your reaction to those types of stories?

[…]

A: Well, it’s hard to answer the question because in my mind I still hear people saying we were low‑level employees, so we were lower than dirt, according to people in D.C.  So, take it for what it is.  They were basically throwing us underneath the bus.

******

Q: So is it your perspective that ultimately the responsible parties for the decisions that were reported by the IG are not in the Cincinnati office?

A: I don’t know how to answer that question.  I mean, from an agent standpoint, we didn’t do anything wrong. We followed directions based on other people telling us what to do.

Q: And you ultimately followed directions from Washington; is that correct?

A: If direction had come down from Washington, yes.

Q: But with respect to the particular scrutiny that was given to Tea Party applications, those directions emanated from Washington; is that right?

A: I believe so.

The more senior employee told committee staff he was scared at the idea of being blamed for this operation, which he said was being directed from Washington D.C.

Q: But you specifically recall that the BOLO terms included “Tea Party?”

A: Yes, I do.

Q: And it was your understanding ‑‑ was it your understanding that the purpose of the BOLO was to identify Tea Party groups?

A: That is correct.

Q: Was it your understanding that the purpose of the BOLO was to identify conservative groups?

A: Yes, it was.

Q: Was it your understanding that the purpose of the BOLO was to identify Republican groups?

A: Yes, it was.

******

Q: Earlier I believe you informed us that the primary reason for applying for another job in July [2010] was because of the micromanagement from [Washington, DC, IRS Attorney], is that correct?

A: Right.  It was the whole Tea Party. It was the whole picture. I mean, it was the micromanagement. The fact that the subject area was extremely sensitive and it was something that I didn’t want to be associated with.

Q: Why didn’t you want to be associated with it?

A: For what happened now. I mean, rogue agent? Even though I was taking all my direction from EO Technical [Washington, D.C], I didn’t want my name in the paper for being this rogue agent for a project I had no control over.

Q: Did you think there was something inappropriate about what was happening in 2010?

A: Yes. The inappropriateness was not processing these applications fairly and timely.

******

Q: You have stated you had concerns with the fairness and the timeliness of the application process. Did you have concerns with just the fact that these cases were grouped together and you were the only one handling them?

A: I was the only one handling the Tea Party’s, that is correct.

Q: Did that specifically cause you concern?

A: Yes, it did. And I was the only person handling them.

Q:  Were you concerned that you didn’t have the capacity to process all of the applications in a timely manner?

A: That is correct. And it is just ‑‑ I mean, like you brought up, the micromanagement, the fact that the topic was just weirdly handled was a huge concern to me.

--

Follow Becket Adams (@BecketAdams) on Twitter

(H/T: BuzzFeed). Featured image Getty Images.

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