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Franklin Graham Shares Gripping Story of How He Got Former Ebola Patient Into the U.S. — and Glenn Beck Says It Shows the CDC Is 'Out of Control\

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Dr. Kent Brantly and his wife, Amber, are seen in an undated photo provided by Samaritan's Purse. Brantly became the first person infected with Ebola to be brought to the United States from Africa, arriving at at Emory University Hospital, in Atlanta on Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. Fellow aid worker Nancy Writebol was expected to arrive in several days. Experts say Emory University Hospital is one of the safest places in the world to treat someone with Ebola, the virus that has killed more than 700 people in Africa. (AP/Samaritan's Purse)

Glenn Beck on Thursday shared the backstory of how Dr. Kent Brantly, the American doctor infected with Ebola in August, was brought from West Africa to a hospital in the United States. Beck said he was at a dinner Wednesday with Franklin Graham, the president of the charity Brantly was working with when he contracted the disease, and Graham told him the full story.

Beck said what Graham told him made him believe the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is "way out of control and way over their head on this."

"I said, 'Oh my gosh, Franklin, what was that like?'" Beck said. "He began to tell the story. And we'll try to bring him in hopefully next week. I want him to tell the story because, coming firsthand, it was electrifying."

Beck said when Graham got the news that Brantly had Ebola, he and his staff called anybody and everybody to see if there was anything that could be done.

Dr. Kent Brantly and his wife, Amber, are seen in an undated photo provided by Samaritan's Purse. Brantly became the first person infected with Ebola to be brought to the United States from Africa, arriving at at Emory University Hospital, in Atlanta on Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. Fellow aid worker Nancy Writebol was expected to arrive in several days. (AP/Samaritan's Purse) Dr. Kent Brantly and his wife, Amber, are seen in an undated photo provided by Samaritan's Purse. Brantly became the first person infected with Ebola to be brought to the United States from Africa, arriving at at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta on Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. Fellow aid worker Nancy Writebol was expected to arrive in several days. (AP/Samaritan's Purse)

"They get a call from this company in San Diego," Beck said. "And they say, 'We have an experimental drug, never been tried on a human before,' and apparently it involves mouse blood and tobacco leaves. I mean, it sounds crazy. ... So they start talking about it, and it's decided not it to give him."

Beck said while they were trying to find a cure, Graham was also trying to find a plane that would bring Brantly and others back from West Africa. He said he called the State Department, the White House and everyone he could think of, eventually getting through to the person in charge of the medical plane equipped to quarantine deadly diseases.

"[Graham] explained the situation. And [the man] said, 'Well, today is your lucky day because I'm in charge of that plane.' And Franklin said, 'Who do I have to call above you to get this signed off?' He said, 'Nobody. Me. I'm in charge of it.'"

Beck said the man told Graham he could use the plane, but he would have to pay for it, and Graham readily agreed.

Most people are familiar with what happened next -- Brantly was brought to the United States and the experimental treatment they had originally opted not to use was tried. It worked, and Brantly recovered.

But Beck said that isn't what gave him the impression that the CDC is "way out of control and way over their head on this."

A woman in protective clothing drives an ambulance after departing Dobbins Air Reserve Base in Marietta., Ga., en route Emory University Hospital in Atlanta Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. A specially outfitted plane carrying Dr. Kent Brantly from West Africa  arrived at a military base in Georgia. Brantly was taken to the Atlanta hospital.  Another American with Ebola is expected to join him at the hospital in a few days. (AP Photo/John Bazemore) A woman in protective clothing drives an ambulance after departing Dobbins Air Reserve Base in Marietta., Ga., en route Emory University Hospital in Atlanta Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014. A specially outfitted plane carrying Dr. Kent Brantly from West Africa arrived at a military base in Georgia. Brantly was taken to the Atlanta hospital. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

"When [Graham] gets [Brantly] over into the hospital, they come in and they quarantine him," Beck said. "There are, I think, 35 others that have returned from Africa that were working in that hospital, the same as [Brantly]. They've been around this doctor. They've been around the hospital."

"We all saw the caravan, but what we didn't see is this: Franklin says, 'Okay, we've got 35 people. Where do we keep them for 21 days?'" Beck said, noting that Ebola can incubate for 21 days. "The CDC says, 'Oh, don't worry. Just send them home.'"

"Now, here's Graham, not a doctor, saying, 'I don't think that's a good idea. I don't think sending them home is a good idea. ... They should be in the quarantine for 21 days. We don't know if they have the Ebola.'"

So Beck said Graham found a place near the hospital and asked those exposed to the Ebola virus to stay there until they were confident they wouldn't spread the disease to the rest of the country.

"Well apparently, several days into this, the hospital finds out that they've done this," Beck said. "And the hospital is upset because of PR. 'How is this going to look?...' This goes to exactly to what Rand Paul was saying yesterday: political correctness."

"We've got to stop the political correctness," Beck said. "Political correctness is stopping us from restricting air travel to West Africa. ... The president stopped all air travel to Israel on the threat of a missile. ... And they did it that fast."

When Beck's co-host, Stu Burguiere, noted that CDC Director Thomas Frieden tweeted that "the impulse to isolate countries may make #Ebola epidemic worse," Beck concluded that "the CDC is out of control."

Beck said rampant incompetence and political correctness in government -- from the CDC to the Secret Service -- is "literally going to kill all of us."

"I'm telling you we're going to be humbled because we won't recognize reality anymore," he concluded. "And when you won't recognize reality, reality has a way of sneaking up behind you."

The CDC did not immediately return TheBlaze's request for comment.

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