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GOP lawmakers propose 'Separation of Powers Act' to thwart Obama

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WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 20: U.S. House of Representatives Victims' Rights Caucus Chairman Rep. Ted Poe (R-TX) talks about the anti-human trafficking legislation his is sponsoring outside the U.S. Capitol May 20, 2014 in Washington, DC. Poe is leading a group of bipartisan lawmakers urging their colleagues to vote for The Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act and The Human Trafficking Fraud Enforcement Act of 2014. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Two House Republicans have introduced new legislation to block the federal government from implementing President Barack Obama's executive action on immigration.

The "Separation of Powers Act," from Reps. Ted Poe (R-Texas) and Diane Black (R-Tenn.), would stop funding for any deferred deportation action under Obama's plan, and also stop funding for any new green cards that would be created by the White House. It's one version of a bill that could be considered by House Republicans when they get back from the Thanksgiving break.

WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 20: U.S. House of Representatives Victims' Rights Caucus Chairman Rep. Ted Poe (R-TX) talks about the anti-human trafficking legislation his is sponsoring outside the U.S. Capitol May 20, 2014 in Washington, DC. Poe is leading a group of bipartisan lawmakers urging their colleagues to vote for The Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act and The Human Trafficking Fraud Enforcement Act of 2014. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Rep. Ted Poe (R-Texas) is one of two cosponsors of legislation aimed at stopping President Obama's executive action on immigraiton. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

"Time and again this lawless administration has defied Congress in order to unilaterally implement its own agenda," Poe said Thursday. "This legislation will allow Congress to exercise its 'check' on an out-of-control White House that treats the Constitution as a mere suggestion, not the law of the land."

Black added that Obama would "regret" his decision, and said the bill is a good start as the House begins to consider how to react to Obama's announcement. "The American public has loudly voiced their objections to the president circumventing Congress like this, and now President Obama has ignored the will of the people and set a terrible precedent for future administrations."

Republicans are somewhat split over how to respond to Obama's move, although House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) pledged Friday that some action would be taken after Thanksgiving. "We will, in fact, act," he told reporters.

Read the Poe/Black bill here:

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