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After the Government Broke Its Promise, Tens of Thousands Marched Against Abortion in Spain

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"Every life matters."

Anti-abortion supporters take part in a march in Madrid on September 22, 2014. Tens of thousands of Spaniards rallied in Madrid today, threatening to punish the government in elections next year unless it revives a plan to restrict women's access to abortion. Demonstrators of all ages from across the country marched through the capital, whistling angrily as they passed the headquarters of the ruling Popular Party. AFP PHOTO/ DANI POZO

MADRID (TheBlaze/AP) — The government pledged to restrict abortions, then it backed down.

Now tens of thousands of people have taken part in a demonstration in Madrid to protest against the conservative government's decision to scrap plans to restrict the availability of abortion.

Demonstrators hold a banner reading 'live and let live' during a march against abortion in Madrid on September 22, 2014. Tens of thousands of Spaniards rallied in Madrid today, threatening to punish the government in elections next year unless it revives a plan to restrict women's access to abortion. Demonstrators of all ages from across the country marched through the capital, whistling angrily as they passed the headquarters of the ruling Popular Party. AFP PHOTO/ DANI POZO Demonstrators hold a banner reading 'live and let live' during a march against abortion in Madrid on September 22, 2014. Tens of thousands of Spaniards rallied in Madrid today, threatening to punish the government in elections next year unless it revives a plan to restrict women's access to abortion. Demonstrators of all ages from across the country marched through the capital, whistling angrily as they passed the headquarters of the ruling Popular Party. AFP Photo/ Dani Pozo

The march Saturday took place under the slogan "Every Life Matters." Some 500 buses brought people from all over the country to take part.

Anti-abortion supporters take part in a march in Madrid on September 22, 2014. Tens of thousands of Spaniards rallied in Madrid today, threatening to punish the government in elections next year unless it revives a plan to restrict women's access to abortion. Demonstrators of all ages from across the country marched through the capital, whistling angrily as they passed the headquarters of the ruling Popular Party. AFP PHOTO/ DANI POZO Anti-abortion supporters take part in a march in Madrid on September 22, 2014. Tens of thousands of Spaniards rallied in Madrid today, threatening to punish the government in elections next year unless it revives a plan to restrict women's access to abortion. Demonstrators of all ages from across the country marched through the capital, whistling angrily as they passed the headquarters of the ruling Popular Party. AFP Photo/ Dani Pozo

Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy in September ditched a promise by his Popular Party to restrict abortion to only cases of rape or serious health risks, saying there was no consensus for change.

The proposal had stirred much opposition in Spain, where abortion is allowed without restrictions in the first 14 weeks of pregnancy.

Supporters hold flags reading 'Every life matters' during a march against abortion in Madrid on September 22, 2014. Tens of thousands of Spaniards rallied in Madrid today, threatening to punish the government in elections next year unless it revives a plan to restrict women's access to abortion. Demonstrators of all ages from across the country marched through the capital, whistling angrily as they passed the headquarters of the ruling Popular Party. AFP PHOTO/ DANI POZO Supporters hold flags reading 'Every life matters' during a march against abortion in Madrid on September 22, 2014. Tens of thousands of Spaniards rallied in Madrid today, threatening to punish the government in elections next year unless it revives a plan to restrict women's access to abortion. Demonstrators of all ages from across the country marched through the capital, whistling angrily as they passed the headquarters of the ruling Popular Party. AFP Photo/ Dani Pozo

Demonstrators urged supporters to not vote for the Popular Party in elections next year if the government doesn't change the current law.

Historically, Spain has been a bastion of the Catholic faith, and the Roman Catholic Church is staunchly opposed to abortion.

However, while 70 percent of Spaniards claim to be Roman Catholic, 63 percent said they almost never attend religious services, as Princeton University's demographic overview of the country noted, demonstrating how the historical religiosity of Spain butts up against the modern European trend against religious observance.

Follow Zach Noble (@thezachnoble) on Twitter

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