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In New Hampshire Democratic Debate, Candidates Clash on Terrorism, DNC Data Breach

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"I'll make one guarantee: we'll lose."

Hillary Clinton, center, speaks between Bernie Sanders, left, and Martin O’Malley during a Democratic presidential primary debate Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)\n

While Saturday night's Democratic presidential debate in New Hampshire was less singularly focused on foreign policy and the threat of terrorism than Tuesday's Republican debate in Las Vegas, the three candidates also clashed on health care, Wall Street and the recent Democratic National Committee data breach scandal.

Hillary Clinton, center, speaks between Bernie Sanders, left, and Martin O�Malley during a Democratic presidential primary debate Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Independent Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders made the first headline of the night, apologizing to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for his campaign's role in accessing private data that should have been firewalled. "This is not the type of campaign that we run," he said

Clinton hit Republican frontrunner Donald Trump, saying he uses "bluster and bigotry to enflame people" and is unfairly focused on banning all Muslims from the United States. Sanders piled on, arguing that Trump "hates" Mexicans and Muslims. But the Democratic candidates steered clear of discussing the rest of the GOP field.

Sanders didn't take many shots at Clinton, though he did hit the candidate for being "too much into regime change" — borrowing a line of argument from Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul, who's tried to convince the GOP field to stay out foreign conflicts the U.S. has no clear interest in.

After the debate, Sanders adviser Tad Devine said that the strategy was intentional — and being "vicious" to Clinton isn't strategy that will lead to victory.

"If we launch a vicious, personal, negative campaign against Hillary Clinton, I'll make one guarantee: we'll lose," Devine told reporters. "That's not a winning campaign."

There were a few light moments, including when Clinton came back late following a commercial break, acknowledging the crowd's cheers and saying "sorry" when she returned to her podium.

Clinton got the majority of the speaking time: 40 minutes and 37 seconds. Sanders spoke for just over 32 minutes, and former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley got 26 minutes and 10 seconds. As usual, however, Sanders picked up the most Twitter followers over the course of the night.

Data curated by InsideGov

O'Malley, who's a distant third in the polls, was the only candidate to make a personal appearance in the post-debate spin room — held in an ice rink.

Kate Scanlon contributed to this report.

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