Try BlazeTV for Free
FOR RSS

See the photo: Jeep carrying Fidel Castro's ashes breaks down during funeral procession

People hold pictures of the late Fidel Castro during a last homage to him at Antonio Maceo plaza in Santiago, Cuba, Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016. After a four-day journey across the country through small towns and cities where his rebel army fought its way to power nearly 60 years ago, Castro's remains arrived Saturday to Santiago where they will be buried. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

The jeep carrying the ashes of longtime Cuban dictator Fidel Castro broke down during a funeral procession on Saturday, forcing Cuban soldiers to push the old vehicle to Castro's final resting place.

More from FoxNews.com:

The Russian-made jeep ferrying Castro's ashes broke down and needed to be pushed on Saturday en route to the late leader's final resting place.

The breakdown of the jeep in the midst of adoring crowds chanting "Long live Fidel!" was symbolic of the dual nature of Castro's Cuba.

While his legacy inspires fierce adulation by many of the nation's citizens, others continue to grumble about Cuba's autocratic government, inefficient bureaucracy and stagnant economy.

Soldiers push the jeep and trailer carrying the ashes of the late Fidel Castro after the jeep briefly stopped working during Castro's funeral procession near Moncada Fort in Santiago, Cuba, Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016. Castro's ashes will be interred Sunday in Santiago, ending a nine-day period of mourning that saw Cuba fall silent as thousands paid tribute to photographs of Castro and sign oaths of loyalty to his socialist, single-party system. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

The jeep was passing through a two mile throng of people, which lined the streets ahead of the Santa Ifigenia cemetery, where Castro would be laid to rest. His tomb is next to a memorial for soldiers killed during the 1953 Castro-led assault on Santiago's Moncada barracks and in front of a mausoleum of Cuban national hero Jose Marti.

According to Fox, the Cuban military gave Castro a 21-gun salute as the large crowds gathered near the tomb and sang the Cuban national anthem. The ceremony was private and most media was disallowed, including international media. The decision to exclude most media came from Castro's brother, Raul, who said he wanted to keep his brother's wishes to not become a cult of personality.

Castro died late last month at the age of 90.

One last thing…
Watch TheBlaze live and on demand on any device, anywhere, anytime.
try premium
Exclusive video
All Videos
Watch BlazeTV on your favorite device, anytime, anywhere.
Try BlazeTV for Free
Sponsored content
Daily News Highlights

Get the news that matters most delivered directly to your inbox.