Safe space ‘Cry Closet’ — complete with stuffed animals — arrives at university for finals week

Safe space ‘Cry Closet’ — complete with stuffed animals — arrives at university for finals week
Image source: TheBlaze

A “Cry Closet” has arrived at the University of Utah just in time for stressful finals week.

What are the details?

The closet, an art installation, according to KSTU-TV, was student-crafted and is designed as a “safe space” for students to cry it out if they’re too overwhelmed by college life.

On display at the university’s Marriott Library, the closet bears instructions that reads, “A Safe Place for Stressed Out Students.”

“This space is meant to provide a place for students studying for finals to take a short 10 minute break,” the note adds.

What are the closet ‘rules’?

Some of the closet’s “rules” include:

  • Knock before entering.
  • Only one person in the closet at a time.
  • Limit your time in the closet to no more than 10 minutes
  • Turn lights and timer off before leaving
  • Use #cryclosetuofu if posting on social media

The interior of the closet features plush stuffed animals, a timer to notify students when their tearful 10-minute respite is up, and fabric wall lining.

Does the Cry Closet work?

Jana Cunningham, with the University of Utah communications office, said that the closet is perfect for stress relief.

“It’s a great place to just come and decompress, and that’s really what it’s for,” she explained.

Nemo Miller, the closet’s creator and a senior in the college’s fine arts program, told Inside Higher Ed, “I am interested in humanity and the inherent complexities of the human condition. In my work, I reflect on my experiences and explore what it means to be human. One aspect of humanity that I am currently exploring is connections and missed connections through communication. It’s been interesting to watch the response to this piece about human emotions, and I’m proud to see the power of art in action.”

According to KSTU, the Cry Closet will remain in the library for student use until May 2.