Republican condemns ‘appalling’ radio ad aimed at African-Americans in support of his campaign

Republican condemns ‘appalling’ radio ad aimed at African-Americans in support of his campaign
Rep. French Hill (R-Ark.) angrily denounced his Democratic opponent for implying he supported a radio ad that many called racist. (Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Concordia Summit)

A Republican candidate, who is running for the U.S. House of Representatives seat from Arkansas, is denouncing a radio ad in support of his campaign that went viral for its unorthodox message for African-Americans.

‘I condemn this outrageous ad’

The ad went viral on social media for what many called a “racist” message that tied Democrats in the Brett Kavanaugh controversy to the history of blacks being lynched over false accusations of sexual assault from white women.

“Some may have heard an appalling ad on the radio,” Rep. French Hill (R-Ark.) tweeted. “I condemn this outrageous ad in the strongest terms.

“I do not support that message, and there is no place in Arkansas for this nonsense,” he added.

His Democratic opponent, Clarke Tucker, implied that Hill and his allies condoned the racialist messaging.

“Rep. Hill & his allies will have to live with the kind of campaign they’re running,” Tucker tweeted.

“This radio ad is disgraceful & has no place in our society,” he added. “We won’t let these shameful tactics distract us from our fight to stand up for the people in #AR02 on the critical issues in our lives.”

Here’s the controversial and offensive radio ad:

The ad was supported by a political action committee identifying itself as “Black Americans for the President’s Agenda,” but the ad said they were not related to any political campaign.

Hill angrily demanded that Tucker delete his tweet that falsely implied his campaign supported the ad.

“My opponent decided to spread this race baiting ad rather than join in bipartisan condemnation of this message,” Hill tweeted. “I call on @clarketucker to delete his tweet spreading this message unbecoming of political discourse.”