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CNN's Brian Stelter interviews 8th-graders who are learning about detecting 'misinformation' — and viewer reaction is priceless

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Image source: YouTube video screenshot

CNN's Brian Stelter recently interviewed 8th-grade students and their teacher at P.S. 207 in Queens, New York, about their class on how to detect "misinformation" online.

In a video published Sunday, Stelter — CNN's chief media correspondent — spoke to teacher Barbara King, who said she began teaching media literacy 10 years ago and that it's "a skill my students really need; there's too much misinformation around us in the world."

The clip shows King telling her students about satire, false context, imposter content, manipulated content, and fabricated content.

Stelter also interviewed students outside classroom time about how they've been using what they've learned. One student said his family believed COVID-19 was a "hoax" when the pandemic was breaking but that he argued back that it was real.

With that, Stelter emphasized the tendency of some who want to believe untruths — and then added that instead "you gotta face reality head-on."

Mockery ensues

As readers of TheBlaze know, Stelter and CNN repeatedly have been called out for pushing misinformation and bias.

The latest example appears to be Stelter running "cover" for NPR's report — refuted as fake news — claiming Chief Justice John Roberts "in some form" asked justices to wear masks because Justice Sonia Sotomayor has diabetes and that Justice Neil Gorsuch refused, Fox News reported.

All that to say, a number of commenters under CNN's YouTube video of Stelter's report about the "misinformation" class mocked the notion of him interviewing teenagers about the subject:

  • "The irony of Brian Stelter talking about how to spot fake news is pretty incredible," one commenter wrote.
  • "Like, 'Kids, CNN is full of lies, so watch them as an example on how journalism shouldn't be,'" another commenter quipped.
  • "LMAO! Tell me this is a joke!" another commenter wrote. "If Stelter wants to teach kids how to spot misinformation, he should give them a picture of himself.
  • "They should just watch CNN," another commenter said. "They'll be experts in spotting it within a half hour."
  • "How to spot misinformation, eh?" another commenter noted. "They should show a CNN article of the Covington kid then their undisclosed amount they had to pay him for defamation."
  • "Brian Stelter story? On misinformation?!" another commenter remarked. "That's rich."

Anything else?

Don't forget that CNN just last week announced that it's putting together a news team "dedicated to covering misinformation." The announcement also was met with derision.

These students are learning how to spot misinformation youtu.be

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