Faith leaders organize ‘underground railroad’ to hide illegal aliens from Trump’s deportation

Faith leaders organize ‘underground railroad’ to hide illegal aliens from Trump’s deportation
CHICAGO - MAY 25: Rodolfo Gonzalez-Murillo is moved from a van to a jet chartered by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) which will take him and other undocumented immigrants to the U.S. border to be deported on May 25, 2010 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

CNN reported on a secret network being organized in California by faith leaders to hide illegal aliens from immigration officers, and it’s being compared to the “underground railroad” that spirit away runaway slaves to freedom before the Civil War.

“It’s hard as a Jew not to think about both all the people who did open their doors and their homes and take risks to safeguard Jews in moments where they were really vulnerable,” said one man who spoke anonymously about his home being used as a safe house. “As well as those that didn’t. We’d like to be the people who did.”

White sheets on the bed and the clean, adjacent full bathroom bear all the markers of an impending visit. The man, who asked not to be identified, pictures an undocumented woman and her children who may find refuge in his home someday.

The man says he’s never been in trouble before and has difficulty picturing that moment. But he’s well educated and understands the Fourth Amendment, which gives people the right to be secure in their homes, against unreasonable searches and seizures. He’s pictured the moment if ICE were to knock on his door.

“There’s some element of we’re entering into territory that I don’t know exactly what the consequences are,” he said about possibly breaking the law to harbor illegals, “but I think I know what the moral consequences are for me if we don’t act. Like this isn’t a moment to be standing idly by.”

Under a policy put in place by the Obama administration, federal agents will not enter a religious institution without approval, but these faith leaders believe that policy will be rescinded under President Trump. Their response is to prepare with safe houses for illegal aliens, which would fall under 4th Amendment protection, and require officials to obtain a warrant before entering.

Reverend Zach Hoover of L.A. Voice says that the network can currently house hundreds of illegals all over Southern California but believes they will be reaching into the thousands soon. “People will be moving into a place so that ICE can’t find them,” he explained, “so that they can stay with their family, so that they can be with their husbands, so that they can avoid being detained and deported.”

“The idea comes from leaders of all faiths in Los Angeles, just days after the election pledging opposition to Trump’s immigration orders,” reported Kyung Lah of CNN.

“People who may not agree with you” Lah asked of Reverend Hoover, “will look at what you’re doing and saying, you’re simply aiding and abetting the violation of federal laws.”

“Look, I’ll speak for myself,” he answered. “I feel really convicted that I answer to God, at the end of the day. That’s who I’m gonna see when I die. And I hope that we can live up to who we are.”

“We’re trusting in God that He would help us, guide us to make the right decision,” says Pastor Ada Valiente, another supporter of these illegal alien safe houses.

President Trump made it a campaign promise to deport illegal aliens, but has recently stepped back from some of his more strict pronouncements, including that involving Obama’s “DREAM act” recipients. Trump supporters like Laura Wilkerson, whose son was viciously murdered by an illegal alien, say they still trust in Trump about building the wall and deporting illegal immigrants, estimated at about 11 million. Some liberal mayors are even openly saying they will defy Trump on his sanctuary city order.

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