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The Cantor Loss Viewed Through the Eyes of a Conservative Latino

Politics

The D.C. elites are in full panic mode that immigration reform will die with Eric Cantor's House career. They should be focused on listening to the voters.

FILE - In this Jan. 8, 2014 file photo, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Va. speaks about The Value of School Choice: The Release of the 2013 Education Choice and Competition Index, at the Brookings Institute in Washington. Lawmakers looking ahead to the November elections are putting renewed focus on education, tackling issues on Capitol Hill this week ranging from expanding charter schools to paying off student loan debt. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) AP Photo/Susan Walsh

Washington, D.C. insiders are worried about what the defeat of the GOP establishment’s House Majority Leader Eric Cantor will mean for their push for immigration reform.

I think the reaction is telling and quite explanatory of continued losses for the GOP. The hand-wringing is over the elitist’s hampered plans, not the fact that a wayward politician was spanked by the voters for thwarting their will. Such is the state of Washington, D.C. in the era of Obama.

Already team-Obama, Democrats, and some frightened Republicans are claiming that Cantor’s support for immigration reform had nothing to do with his defeat. As I try and fight through my dismay and full-throated belly-laughing at the insanity of the claim, allow me to gain my composure long enough to share the following fact: Cantor identified immigration reform as a “top priority” in 2014.

FILE - In this Jan. 8, 2014 file photo, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Va. speaks about The Value of School Choice: The Release of the 2013 Education Choice and Competition Index, at the Brookings Institute in Washington. Lawmakers looking ahead to the November elections are putting renewed focus on education, tackling issues on Capitol Hill this week ranging from expanding charter schools to paying off student loan debt. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) AP Photo/Susan Walsh FILE - In this Jan. 8, 2014 file photo, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Va. speaks about The Value of School Choice: The Release of the 2013 Education Choice and Competition Index, at the Brookings Institute in Washington. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) 

Politico cited a Democrat poll as evidence that Cantor’s loss had nothing to do with his obsession with immigration reform:

“About 72 percent of registered voters in Cantor’s district polled on Tuesday said they either ‘strongly’ or ‘somewhat’ support immigration reform that would secure the borders, block employers from hiring those here illegally, and allow undocumented residents without criminal backgrounds to gain legal status.”

Politico quickly points out that these components are key tenets of proposed overhaul measures being considered on Capitol Hill today. The only problem is these tenets have been part of promised reform for decades. Further, these tenets were in the failed amnesty law of 1986 as well.

The truth is that none of the immigration "solutions" proffered --- thus far -- by anyone in government can achieve the results desired by 72 percent of Eric Cantor’s district, and indeed the country.

Another truth is that the GOP was stealthy in their push for immigration reform, seeking to put one over a Tea Party-infused grassroots.

America has learned from the 1986 failure. Too bad Washington has not. The voters in Virginia -- and “We the People” in general -- don’t trust lawmakers in Washington. In an era where Resident Obama breaks the law with astonishing brazenness and regularity, can we be blamed for that distrust? Can we be blamed when the alleged opposing party seems willing to go along with this breach of public trust?

This process of immigration reform must be transparent and address the major issues Americans want addressed; primarily the elimination of mass illegal immigration.

Meaningful reform must remove the word “discretion” from pertaining to immigration law. “Leaders” from both parties, evidenced by 12-20 million illegals in the country, have proven they can’t handle that responsibility.

Arbitrary, union-protecting quotas must be removed from immigration law so the U.S. can make choices based on our economic needs, not false labor markets created by liberal extremists.

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., delivers a concession speech in Richmond, Va., Tuesday, June 10, 2014. Cantor lost in the GOP primary to tea party candidate Dave Brat. (AP Photo/Steve Helber) AP Photo/Steve Helber House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., delivers a concession speech in Richmond, Va., Tuesday, June 10, 2014. Cantor lost in the GOP primary to tea party candidate Dave Brat. (AP Photo/Steve Helber) 

Finally, while real immigration reform is underway, illegal immigration must come to an end in America.

Cantor was a full-throated supporter of misguided attempts at immigration reform. He lost touch with his constituents when he focused on placating the Democrat voter drive and the Chamber's cheap labor requirements embedded in various incarnations of alleged immigration reform.

The voters in Virginia’s 7th District recognized that these “solutions” didn’t actually solve the problems plaguing our immigration system. They only papered over the problems in an effort to shut the American people up.

Further, Cantor's defeat shows that the American people are done with being promised the "rule of law," and instead given lawlessness.

I share the sentiments of millions of hardworking Americans (and legal immigrants!) when I say that I don't care about the Chamber of Commerce agenda. I don't care that liberals want a permanent underclass. I want the problem solved to the benefit of the United States and our people.

A society's worth isn't measured by how much power is seized by its government but rather, how much power is reserved for its people.

We can’t expect the Democrats to behave like grown-ups. So, the GOP must remember its roots and lead in the light of day. They can start with some therapeutic realism.

Repeat after me: “Illegal immigration is wrong and is bad for America. Illegal immigration is wrong and is bad for America. Illegal immigration is wrong and is bad for America.”

If only the GOP will listen.

TheBlaze contributor channel supports an open discourse on a range of views. The opinions expressed in this channel are solely those of each individual author.

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