Watch LIVE

A French Nurse Just Beat Ebola's Death Sentence

News
A woman wears protective clothing during a tour of one of the Ebola Centers in Harare, Zimbabwe, Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014. Zimbabwe, which has not reported any cases of the deadly virus wreaking havoc in West Africa, is on high alert and has set up Ebola centers in order to screen people suspected of the virus. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)

PARIS (TheBlaze/AP) — Doctors Without Borders says the French nurse who became infected with Ebola while working in Liberia has recovered from the disease, providing a glimmer of hope even as the deadly outbreak spread to American shores this week.

The medical charity, which has shouldered a large part of the response to the West African outbreak, said Saturday that it received confirmation from the French Health Ministry that the woman had survived the disease. She was evacuated from Liberia and cared for at a hospital near Paris.

The University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf in Germany also said Saturday that a Senegalese scientist who was infected with Ebola in Sierra Leone has recovered and been discharged.

Doctors and nurses have become infected in particularly large numbers in this outbreak — the World Health Organization says 382 health workers have been infected, and more than half of them have died — but survival stories are a growing source of hope.

American aid workers Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol both recovered from Ebola infection, due largely to rapid and expert medical intervention in Emory University Hospital’s Infectious Disease Unit.

ATLANTA, GA - AUGUST 21:  Dr. Kent Brantly, an Ebola patient at Emory Hospital, talks at a press conference about his release from the hospital on August 21, 2014 in Atlanta, Georgia.  Dr. Brantly and another patient, Nancy Writebol, were released from Emory Hospital after receiving treatment for Ebola that they both contracted while working as medical missionaries in Liberia.  (Jessica McGowan/Getty Images) Dr. Kent Brantly, an Ebola patient at Emory Hospital, talks at a press conference about his release from the hospital on August 21, 2014 in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. Brantly and another patient, Nancy Writebol, were released from Emory Hospital after receiving treatment for Ebola that they both contracted while working as medical missionaries in Liberia. (Jessica McGowan/Getty Images)

Questions surround the apparent mishandling of the first patient to be diagnosed with Ebola inside the U.S., who may have exposed many people to the virus before finally being quarantined, but the successful treatment of doctors and nurses sends a heartening message: Modern medicine is not helpless in the face of Ebola.

Featured image via the Associated Press

Follow Zach Noble (@thezachnoble) on Twitter

Most recent
All Articles