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Glenn Beck explains the 'I Choose Hope' event happening on Nov. 19

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"If we as individuals change, it sets off a ripple that becomes Niagara Falls."

Mike Opelka (left) and Glenn Beck (right) talked about the upcoming "I Choose Hope" event on PureOpelka. (Photo credit: TheBlaze.com)

Next week will be all about a four-letter word — "hope."

On Nov. 19, all three outlets — TheBlaze.com, TheBlaze Radio Network and GlennBeck.com — will be spotlighting stories of hope. The social media accounts of the various outlets are encouraging everyone to use the hashtag #IChooseHope when sharing inspirational stories.

All of TheBlaze Radio shows will be putting hard news and politics on the sidelines for the day ... unless they are, of course, stories of hope.

Ahead of the big day, Beck stopped by "Pure Opelka" (my radio show on TheBlaze Radio Network) to talk about the event.

During the course of our conversation, we explored the roots of our friendship (now in the middle of its third decade), the ups and downs we shared, and the curious outfit he was wearing the first time that I met him.

Mike Opelka (left) and Glenn Beck (right) talked about the upcoming "I Choose Hope" event on PureOpelka. (Photo credit: TheBlaze.com) Long-time friends Mike Opelka (left) and Glenn Beck (right) talked about the upcoming "I Choose Hope" event on PureOpelka. (Photo credit: TheBlaze.com)

When Beck first announced his plan for "I Choose Hope," I wondered why: Why choose a word that was so instrumental in getting Barack Obama elected?

Beck explained that Obama's hope "wasn't based in truth, it was based in image ... based in smoke and mirrors." He continued, "Real hope comes from truth. Let's look for things that are authentic."

Beck shared his belief that real hope and fulfillment comes from "service to others." He referenced Charlie Chaplin's 1952 film "Limelight." The Internet Movie Data Base summarizes the story (Chaplin wrote, directed and starred in) as, "A fading comedian and a suicidally despondent ballet dancer must look to each other to find meaning and hope in their lives."

About the movie, Beck said, "It's Charlie Chaplin's story, I think ... and he's wondering if anything he did means anything at all." He continued, "And he ends up serving somebody else. He falls in love with somebody else and serves them and gives them hope."

We talked at length about giving hope to others through service and the power that such service can create.

Beck wrapped up our discussion saying, "In the end, it's not about the collective, it's about the individual."

"If we as individuals change, it sets off a ripple that becomes Niagara Falls," Beck said.

Listen to my interview with Glenn Beck (Note: the Beck portion starts at the 7:45 mark of the recording):

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Follow Mike Opelka (@Stuntbrain) on Twitter.

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