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There's Been a Twist in the Crazy Nut Blowup on a Korean Airline, and It Involves Someone Ironic Taking Responsibility

The macadamia nuts were supposed to be served on a plate and not delivered in a bag.

Image: Shutterstock.com

The macadamia nuts were supposed to be served on a plate and not delivered in a bag. That is the alleged violation of company policy that reportedly triggered a vice president of Korean Air to order a flight back to the terminal and have the offending flight attendant removed from the plane.

One week later, the story has a new twist: The VP's father, who happens to be the company owner and chairman, is also asking for forgiveness and saying he's responsible for not raising his daughter right.

Heather Cho, the executive vice president of the airline, has formally apologized and resigned her position with the company. But now Cho's father, Cho Yang-ho, blamed himself for his daughter's "foolish" actions. Good Morning America's Joohee Chen reported the embarrassed dad took the heat not raising his daughter better, adding, "As chairman and father, I ask for the public's generous forgiveness."

Image: AP Photo/Lee Jin-man Image: AP Photo/Lee Jin-man

Image: AP Photo/Lee Jin-man Image: AP Photo/Lee Jin-man

“Please blame me; it’s my fault,” he said, adding, “I failed to raise her properly.”

According to a BBC.com report, a December 5 flight from New York to Incheon, South Korea, was delayed when Heather Cho discovered the nutty error.

Cho was on the flight as a passenger, but has stated that her actions were taken in the interest of quality control. Her online biography posted on Singapore's Nanyang Business School website states her job duties do include "managing Catering and In-Flight Sales Business."

A story from the Korea Times claims Cho was yelling at crew members and speculates that her actions may have violated aviation laws. An investigation into her actions is reportedly underway.

Did Cho's alleged temper tantrum delay the flight? The trip, normally scheduled to take just over 14 hours, reportedly arrived 11 minutes late.

Korea's Transport Ministry has started an investigation into Cho's actions. If she is found to have violated the Aviation Safety Law governing passenger behavior, the former airline executive could face up to ten years in prison.

(H/T: Bloomberg.com)

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Follow Mike Opelka (@Stuntbrain) on Twitter.com

 

 

 

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