Netflix adds former Obama official Susan Rice to its board of directors

Netflix adds former Obama official Susan Rice to its board of directors
Former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice named to the Netflix board of directors on Wednesday. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Streaming giant Netflix announced on Wednesday that former U.S. Ambassador and national security adviser Susan Rice has been added to its board of directors.

In the release, Netflix co-founder and CEO Reed Hastings said, “We are delighted to welcome Ambassador Rice to the Netflix board. For decades, she has tackled difficult, complex global issues with intelligence, integrity and insight and we look forward to benefiting from her experience and wisdom.”

The appointment comes just a few weeks after The New York Times announced that Rice’s old boss, former president Barack Obama, is in talks with Netflix to produce a series of exclusive shows.

Rice responded to her new appointment, saying, “I am thrilled to be joining the board of directors of Netflix, a cutting-edge company whose leadership, high-quality productions, and unique culture I deeply admire.”

According to Citi Research, Netflix will reach 262 million subscribers in the next decade.

Fortune speculated that Rice’s work as a former U.N. ambassador might serve the firm well as it expands its presence in international markets.

But CNN reported that not all Netflix customers are happy with the addition of Rice to the company’s board, with some publicly threatening to cancel their subscriptions and even sell their shares in the company.

Ambassador Rice has been no stranger to controversy in recent years, including her alleged downplaying of the 2012 Benghazi attack that resulted in American deaths, and requested unmasking of Trump aides.

Some Netflix subscribers and stock owners expressed outrage on Twitter in response to the news Wednesday, using the hashtag: #BoycottNetflix.

Fortune reported that Netflix shares were down 3.7 percent midday on Wednesday, citing a “broader sell off of tech stocks.”