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Reporter asks Sarah Huckabee Sanders about invoking 25th Amendment. She doesn't mince words.

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When a reporter asked White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders about the 25th Amendment, she shut down that line of questioning really quick. (Image source: Twitter video screenshot)

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders shut down a reporter's line of questioning when it came to the 25th Amendment during Monday's press briefing at the White House.

What are the details?

During the press briefing, a reporter asked Sanders off-camera what President Donald Trump thinks of discussions of the 25th Amendment.

The reporter asked, "What does the president make of all this talk of the 25th Amendment and some of what he hears on the media outlets regarding the word 'crazy talk'? It seems there's a lot of talk about that on many of the mainstream media outlets."

Sanders fired back: "I think we would say that it's about as ridiculous as most of Bob Woodward's book."

"The fact that that's being honestly discussed is ridiculous, and frankly, it's insulting to the nearly 62 million people that came out and overwhelmingly supported this president, voted for him, supported his agenda, and are watching and cheering on as he successfully implements that agenda every single day," she added.

 

Why is anyone even discussing the 25th Amendment?

A September New York Times op-ed that was penned by a person who claimed to be an senior Trump administration official claims other White House officials are considering invoking the 25th Amendment in order to remove Trump from office.

Vice President Mike Pence even came to defend the Trump administration's honor, alleging that there has been no such internal talk about invoking the 25th Amendment against Trump.

The 25th Amendment contains a provision that allows for the removal a sitting president outside of the impeachment process. The relevant portion states:

Whenever the Vice President and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive departments or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice President shall immediately assume the powers and duties of the office as Acting President.

Thereafter, when the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives his written declaration that no inability exists, he shall resume the powers and duties of his office unless the Vice President and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive department or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit within four days to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office. Thereupon Congress shall decide the issue, assembling within forty-eight hours for that purpose if not in session. If the Congress, within twenty-one days after receipt of the latter written declaration, or, if Congress is not in session, within twenty-one days after Congress is required to assemble, determines by two-thirds vote of both Houses that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice President shall continue to discharge the same as Acting President; otherwise, the President shall resume the powers and duties of his office.

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