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US administers its first COVID-19 vaccine on a New York ICU nurse

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ICU Nurse Sandra Lindsay receives the first coronavirus vaccine

Photo by MARK LENNIHAN/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

The United States has administered the very first Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine, according to various reporting.

What are the details?

The U.S. rollout began on Monday as Sandra Lindsay, a critical care nurse from Northwell Long Island Jewish Medical Center in Queens, New York, received the coronavirus vaccine at 9:23 ET on Monday, according to CNN.

The event was livestreamed with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D).

"You didn't flinch," Cuomo quipped of Lindsay's vaccination.

Of the vaccine, Lindsay said, "I'm feeling well. I would like to thank all of the frontline workers and all my colleagues ... doing their job during this pandemic all over the world. ... I feel hopeful today, relieved. I hope this marks the beginning of a the end of a very painful time."

Cuomo added, "In New York, we prioritized health care workers at the top of the list to receive the vaccine because we know that you are out there every day putting your lives in danger for the rest of us."

"So this is the light at the end of the tunnel," he added. "But it's a long tunnel and we need people to continue to be doing the right thing. And the smart thing, all through the holiday season. And hopefully, when we get to about June, they estimate the vaccine can hit critical mass, but the health care workers will get it first because we know that you're super stressed during this holiday season."

What else?

According to reports, the University of Louisville Hospital in Louisville, Kentucky, received its first delivery of the vaccine this morning, and other areas in New York, Connecticut, Iowa, Michigan, and Washington, D.C., are also expected to administer COVID-19 vaccines on Monday.

CNN reported, "The first batch of the vaccine was shipped out from a Pfizer plant in Portage, Michigan, on Sunday headed for over 600 sites across all 50 states."

Health officials first began administering the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines last week in the United Kingdom. Following the injections, at least two people saw allergic reactions to the vaccine, prompting experts to announce that people with histories of significant allergic reaction avoid the vaccine.

Experts say the vaccine is given as two separate shots administered 21 days apart.

At the time of this reporting, researchers at Johns Hopkins University estimate that there have been at least 16,262,304 confirmed COVID-19 infections in the United States, with at least 299,246 fatalities as a result of the deadly virus.

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