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Google Is Reportedly In Talks With Mobile Carriers. Here's How That Could Affect Your Privacy

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A sign is posted on the exterior of Google headquarters on January 30, 2014 in Mountain View, California. Google reported a 17 percent rise in fourth quarter earnings with profits of $3.38 billion, or $9.90 a share compared to $2.9 billion, or $8.62 per share one year ago. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Google is actively looking to increase the number of its users — and to do that, it's entering the wireless data arena.

The search engine giant is reportedly looking into offering discounted wireless data plans in the hopes of luring mobile customers from its competitors. The idea is that those mobile customers will spend more time on the Web – and on Google's websites, the Associated Press reported.

MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA - JANUARY 30: A sign is posted on the exterior of Google headquarters on January 30, 2014 in Mountain View, California. Google reported a 17 percent rise in fourth quarter earnings with profits of $3.38 billion, or $9.90 a share compared to $2.9 billion, or $8.62 per share one year ago. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA - JANUARY 30: A sign is posted on the exterior of Google headquarters on January 30, 2014 in Mountain View, California. Google reported a 17 percent rise in fourth quarter earnings with profits of $3.38 billion, or $9.90 a share compared to $2.9 billion, or $8.62 per share one year ago. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

The new cell service, also reportedly being called Project Nova, could bring Google more advertising dollars and perhaps even more opportunities to more effectively target its users, an advantage that could also allow it to charge more money to businesses looking to advertise.

Google has reportedly been in talks with mobile carriers T-Mobile and Sprint for portions of paid access to the wireless networks in a potential move that could bring both of the mobile carriers short-term gains but pose long-term risks and Google grows in both size and profit.

The Mountain View, California-based Internet giant has already broken into the cable TV and Internet business by launching its own service, Google Fiber, in Kansas City, Kansas, Kansas City, Missouri, Provo, Utah and Austin, Texas.

While it's not common, Google wouldn't be the first to essentially lease other companies' wireless network for a profit. The discount mobile carriers Tracfone and Simple Mobile currently do the same, according to TheVerge.

And there are other foreseen advantages to launching its own mobile carrier services. For example, by controlling the network, Google is in a better position to ensure it customers are receiving the type of service with which the company intends to provide for them. While it's unknown whether Google might be planning to aggregate space on various wireless networks, TheVerge reported that could help the internet giant gain a stronger footing in the mobile market by offering its customers coverage in more areas.

But the move could also be a way in which the company can more effectively target its users thereby enabling it to sell advertising at a higher price. The company already has its own Android operating system for smartphones.

The company has faced previous criticism over its privacy policies, with some privacy proponents alleging it doesn't do enough to protect users' private data, such as their geographic locations and email messages.

Representatives from Google didn't immediately respond to TheBlaze when asked to comment on the matter. Neither would representatives from Sprint or T-Mobile.

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