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Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer introducing legislation to abolish the Electoral College

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California Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

California Sen. Barbara Boxer (D) is introducing legislation Tuesday to abolish the Electoral College after Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton won the popular vote but failed to secure the necessary 270 electoral votes on Election Day.

In a statement on the bill, Boxer noted President-elect Donald Trump's ever-changing position on the Electoral College. In 2012, he called the constitutional system "a disaster for a democracy" and stood by his criticism during a "60 Minutes" interview Sunday, saying he "would rather see it where you went with simple votes. You know, you get 100 million votes and somebody else gets 90 million votes and you win."

But, as Trump often does, he totally reversed his position on Twitter Tuesday morning, describing the Electoral College as "actually genius."

Boxer went on to say Clinton is "on track to have received more votes than any other presidential candidate in history except Barack Obama." Should the vote trend continue, Clinton will become the fifth presidential candidate to win the popular vote but fall short of the White House.

"The Electoral College is an outdated, undemocratic system that does not reflect our modern society, and it needs to change immediately," the liberal lawmaker added.

It is worth noting that one of the main reasons for the Electoral College is it guarantees voters have a voice.

While the people don't vote directly for a candidate, but for electors, the system helps prevent larger states such as California, Texas or New York from being the sole determinants of each election. With swing states constantly in flux, the Electoral College requires candidates to win the support of multiple demographics from every region in the country.

Nevertheless, Boxer has apparently made reversing the Electoral College one of her new goals.

During a tearful interview with Chelsea Handler last week over Clinton's loss, the California senator said her "heart is on the floor" and described the Electoral College as "a bad system" that was "set up so long ago," lamenting that the former secretary of state lost even though "millennials voted overwhelmingly" for her.

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