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This is a drastically different account of white teens wearing MAGA hats to black university

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Image source: TheBlaze

Other teens who were involved in the Howard University controversy, which saw white female high school students facing intense criticism after donning pro-Trump gear to a historically black university, have come forward with their side of the story.

The background

Two white female high school students visited Howard University last week while wearing pro-Trump gear. As a result, the girls caught major flak from Howard University students both in person and on social media, including threats of violence.

One of the girls involved in the fray shared her story on social media and addressed the hate she and a friend received as a result of their decision to visit the university wearing their Trump-supporting clothing.

The student said that she and another friend wore attire supporting President Donald Trump and noted that black university students were outraged by their nerve and called the duo "racist." She added that one of the students approached the pair and took away her "Make America Great Again" hat.

The other side of the coin

Two black students from the girls' group reportedly advised the white girls to remove their Trump apparel prior to visiting Howard University.

In an account documented by Buzzfeed, student Eunissa Pullium revealed that the girls — who initially told Buzzfeed that they were not "warned" to avoid Trump-supporting clothing to the university, and said they were unaware that Howard University was a traditionally black university — received warnings from tour guides to avoid inflammatory behaviors.

Pullium told Buzzfeed: "Our tour guide told us it was an HBCU [historically black college/university] and everything, and that's when we looked at what they were wearing and said, 'You can't wear that to a historically black college.' They just ignored it, like we didn’t say it at all."

Quityn Rogers, another student, revealed that other people warned the white girls before entering the cafeteria that it wouldn't be a good idea to wear their hats into the facility.

"Before we got in the cafe we told them to take off the hats," Rogers said. "I had a pit in my stomach, I knew something was going to happen. They ignored us. They took matters into their own hands and kept them on."

Rogers added, "You can wear political gear on a field trip. There's nothing wrong with it. But when you’re going to particular places, don't do that. You have to be nice. To me, I felt like that was wrong."

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