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Watch a 57-Year-Old Man Break the Sound Barrier in a Custom Space Suit

"It was a wild, wild ride."

In this photo provided by Paragon Space Development Corporation, Google executive Alan Eustace, in the spacsuit, is carried aloft by a balloon for his leap from the edge of space that broke the sound barrier and set several skydiving records over the southern New Mexico desert outside Roswell Friday, Oct. 24, 2014. Eustace's supersonic jump was part of a project by Paragon Space Development Corp. and its Stratospheric Explorer team, which has been working secretly for years to develop a self-contained commercial spacesuit that would allow people to explore some 20 miles above the Earth's surface.(AP Photo/Paragon Space Development Corporation) AP Photo/Paragon Space Development Corporation

He hurtled down from space, breaking the speed of sound — and a world record — as he fell.

When he hit the ground, he tumbled head-over-heels just once, and then waved a thumbs-up to signal he'd made it

As the New York Times reported, Alan Eustace broke records Friday when he ascended nearly 136,000 feet, then dropped to earth.

In this photo provided by Paragon Space Development Corporation, Google executive Alan Eustace, in the spacsuit, is carried aloft by a balloon for his leap from the edge of space that broke the sound barrier and set several skydiving records over the southern New Mexico desert outside Roswell Friday, Oct. 24, 2014. Eustace's supersonic jump was part of a project by Paragon Space Development Corp. and its Stratospheric Explorer team, which has been working secretly for years to develop a self-contained commercial spacesuit that would allow people to explore some 20 miles above the Earth's surface.(AP Photo/Paragon Space Development Corporation)

The 57-year-old senior vice president at Google reportedly pulled off the feat without the help of his multi-billion dollar company, but rather relied on a small, trusted team of engineers, including Paragon Space Development Corporation, to create the life-support suit and other tools he'd need to make the journey.

"It was a wild, wild ride,” Eustace told the Times. “I hugged on to the equipment module and tucked my legs and I held my heading.”

Alan Eustace. (Image via Twitter) Alan Eustace. (Image via Twitter)

Eustace was lifted by balloon for two hours Friday morning, reaching a height roughly 25 miles above the Earth's surface.

He then used a small explosive device to cut ties with the balloon — setting his descent off with a literal bang — and reached top speeds of 822 miles per hour, creating a sonic boom as he fell to the ground, the Times reported.

In this photo provided by Paragon Space Development Corporation, Google executive Alan Eustace, in the spacesuit, is shown with crew members Blikkies Blignaut, left, and Alex Garbino in preparation his leap from the edge of space that broke the sound barrier and set several skydiving records over the southern New Mexico desert outside Roswell Friday, Oct. 24, 2014. Eustace's supersonic jump was part of a project by Paragon Space Development Corp. and its Stratospheric Explorer team, which has been working secretly for years to develop a self-contained commercial spacesuit that would allow people to explore some 20 miles above the Earth's surface.(AP Photo/Paragon Space Development Corporation)

His parachutes worked perfectly, helping Eustace glide to a landing 70 miles from where he'd started.

Watch highlights from the amazing journey below:

The previous world altitude record was set by Austrian Felix Baumgartner, who made a 128,100-foot parachute drop in 2012, the Times noted.

Follow Zach Noble (@thezachnoble) on Twitter

One last thing…
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