Here’s how many times police responded to Nikolas Cruz’s home before the school shooting

Here’s how many times police responded to Nikolas Cruz’s home before the school shooting
Local law enforcement authorities are being questioned after it was revealed that police had visited the home of the school shooter numerous times since 2010, but had never arrested him. (Susan Stocker - Pool/Getty Images)

Police say that they responded to incidents at the home of Nikolas Cruz numerous times for many years before the heinous school shooting, prompting more questions about whether enough was done to prevent the attack.

A troubling history of violence 

Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel said Friday that there were “20 calls for services in the last few years” to the Cruz household.

“Everyone of these calls for service will be looked at and scrutinized,” Israel said.

The calls span from 2010 to November 2016 and involved Cruz and his younger brother Zachary fighting with each other and with their adoptive mother, Lynda.

However, despite all the calls out to the home, Cruz was never arrested, and was declared “no threat to anyone or himself” by a therapist in a September 28, 2016 police report. 

That report also included the deputies’ observation that Cruz had been harming himself and mentioned obtaining a gun.

It appears that Cruz’ mental state will be used by his defense attorney:

According to reports, Cruz and his brother both suffered from mental health issues, including ADHD and OCD, and took medication as treatment. Cruz’s lawyer said Thursday her client was “a broken human being” and the team was looking into an evaluation for autism.

Failure at the FBI 

The FBI has also been assailed by critics who say the investigative office missed a slew of warnings about the attacker before the shooting. Governor Rick Scott said Friday that FBI Director Christopher Wray needed to resign over the failures of the bureau.

Senator Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) hinted Thursday that more information was forthcoming that would cast doubt on whether warning signs were taken seriously.