Americans haven’t been more satisfied with the state of the country since 2005, poll shows

Americans haven’t been more satisfied with the state of the country since 2005, poll shows
American citizens haven't been more satisfied with the way things are going since September 2005, a Gallup poll shows. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s been nearly 13 years since Americans have been more satisfied with the way things are going than they are now, a recent Gallup poll shows.

Satisfaction is up among Republicans, Democrats and independents alike this month, which could bode well for the GOP as November elections get closer.

Inside the numbers

According to the poll, 37 percent of Americans surveyed in May are satisfied with the way things are going, which is a significant jump from 29 percent in April.

Contributing to the overall boost is a notable increase in satisfaction among Republicans (from 57 percent to 63 percent), independents (26 percent to 35 percent) and even a small increase among Democrats (13 percent to 14 percent).

The poll was taken after the release of the April jobs report, and after North Korea’s announcement that it would stop testing nuclear weapons. It doesn’t take into account North Korea’s recent threats to back out of planned diplomatic talks with the U.S.

The last time overall satisfaction was higher than it is now was September 2005, when 39 percent of Americans were satisfied with the state of the union.

On average this year, 32 percent of American have been satisfied, with some significant fluctuation between several below-30 percent months (January, March, April) and high months like this month and February (36 percent), right after President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address.

Context

The overall satisfaction level of Americans was also 37 percent just before the November 2016 election.

The last time unemployment was as low as it is today, the satisfaction level was 51 percent, back in December 2000. A downward trend in overall satisfaction started in 2005 in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and during the second Iraq War.

Methodology

The poll results come from telephone interviews of 1,024 adults (age 18 and older) in all 50 states and Washington, D.C., between May 1-10. The margin of error is 4 percent.

(H/T The Hill)

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