Christian actor Kevin Sorbo returns Nikes: ‘They hurt my feet when I stand for the national anthem’

Christian actor Kevin Sorbo returns Nikes: ‘They hurt my feet when I stand for the national anthem’
Image source: Jamie McCarthy/Getty

Christian actor Kevin Sorbo has jumped on the Nike boycott bandwagon.

Many former Nike fans began voicing their outrage at the company after it unveiled its latest “Just Do It” ad campaign, which featured former NFL player and activist Colin Kaepernick and the campaign slogan, “Believe in something. Even if it means sacrificing everything.”

What are the details?

In a rather tongue-in-cheek Facebook post, Sorbo revealed that he’d returned a pair of Nikes to a retailer because they hurt his feet while standing for the playing of “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

In an interview with CNS News, Sorbo explained his post, which read, “I just returned a pair of Nike shoes to the store. I complained that they hurt my feet when I stand for the [national anthem].”

Sorbo told the outlet that he felt Nike “blew it.”

“I laughed when I saw the hypocrisy in [the ad],” Sorbo explained.

“Nike blew it,” he added, calling the company’s move to feature Kaepernick in the ad campaign as a “horrible move.”

“Horrible move by them to compare the millions he is still being paid by the NFL and the millions Nike [may have given] him to whine about his misfortune and how he ‘sacrificed’ everything to make a stand against police brutality when true heroes gave their lives to protect his right to whine,” Sorbo explained.

“Only in America can you fail upwardly in sports,” he added.

Sorbo didn’t have many kind words to spare even for Kaepernick himself, saying that he “sucked” as a football player.

What else?

The outlet reported that Sorbo also sarcastically suggested that the NFL and NBA “need more diversity,” such as “more Koreans, more Jewish players, more Russians, more Norwegians, and more people from Guam.

“[It’s] not fair that so many African-Americans are ruling the leagues,” he added. “Just so unfair.”

Sorbo pointed out the obvious sarcasm in his diversity remarks, and adamantly noted that he is a “firm believer” that people ought to “hire the best people for whatever job it is.”