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Former Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey blasts Brian Stelter, says he witnessed incident in which CNN tried to falsify news

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Photo by Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Jack Dorsey, former Twitter CEO and co-founder, hit out at CNN's Brian Stelter on Sunday and said that he has seen CNN promoting falsified news reports and pushing narratives after witnessing an incident that took place during the 2014 Ferguson, Missouri, riots.

What are the details?

Dorsey on Sunday evening hit out at Stelter on Twitter after the CNN host shared a link from the Washington Post, which accused Fox News host Tucker Carlson of "selling doubt" to his core audience.

Dorsey fired back, "And you all are selling hope?"

His response prompted a social media frenzy, with at least one Twitter user accusing him of defending Carlson.

"Not defending a thing. Holding up a mirror," Dorsey quipped.

Dorsey later took aim at the network in response to a tweet from Miss Universe Iraq Sarah Abdali Idan, who wrote, "Even @CNN sometimes sells false news. I know this from covering Iraq events in 2019. People need to understand every media is prone to either mistakes or deliberate corruption. Do your own investigations before believing what they're selling you."

Her remark prompted Dorsey to tweet, "I know this from being on the streets of Ferguson during the protests and watching them try to create conflict and film it causing the protestors to chant 'f*** CNN.'"

Image source: Twitter screenshot

Dorsey did not expound on specific incidents he saw in Ferguson.

What else is there to know?

Dorsey, who rarely speaks out on the social media network he co-founded, also made headlines over the weekend after blasting the company's board of directors amid Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk's bid to purchase and privatize the company.

His criticism came in response to a user's tweet that said, "If I look into the history of Twitter board, it’s intriguing as I was a witness on its early beginnings, mired in plots and coups, and particularly amongst Twitter’s founding members. I wish if it could be made into a Hollywood thriller one day.”

Dorsey — who still sits on the company's board — responded, “It’s consistently been the dysfunction of the company” and agreed with another user's comment that "[g]ood boards don't create good companies, but a bad board will kill a company every time."

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