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Why did abortion doctor keep 2,246 fetal remains? His former colleague says they were gruesome trophies.

He also compared the doctor to Hannibal Lector

Image Source: YouTube screenshot

A former colleague of a controversial abortion doctor says that he believes the fetal remains discovered at his home were gruesome trophies.

Dr. Geoffrey Cly told CBS 2-Chicago that he served as a backup doctor for Ulrich George Klopfer, who died on September 3, and he described him as pathological and deceptive.

"It was shocking to me, taking some tissue, and in this case, fetal tissue home and saving them was just, something that never should be done, I've never heard of anybody doing that before," Cly said.

The family of Klopfer called authorities after they discovered the remains. Police say the family is cooperating with their investigation of the matter.

"So here's a guy who's not trying to do the proper technique on a basic procedure, but yet can save fetal tissue in a very methodical, scientific, tracking way," said Cly, referring to charges that led to Klopfer's medical license being revoked.

"Especially with the documentation, and the putting them in formaldehyde and putting them in a box, absolutely some trophy-aspect," Cly continued.

"The way he saved them, it's like it's something he wanted to preserve as a trophy, as a memory, for some reason," he added.

Klopfer performed abortions at several clinics, including one in South Bend, Indiana. The fetal remains were discovered at his home in Will County, Illinois.

"I think there's a sign that he wants more to be discovered," Cly predicted cryptically.

Here's the video of Klopfer's interview:

Former Colleague Describes Abortion Doctor Klopfer As Pathological www.youtube.com

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